Keith Fitzpatrick-Matthews

1 2 3 13

This summer’s trip will be to Flag Fen, a very significant Bronze Age site, and Crowland Abbey, once an important Benedictine monastery; both sites are east of Peterborough.

Programme for the day:-

8.00am: Pick up point in St. Mary’s Square, Hitchin

8.20am: Pick up point outside Letchworth Library, Broadway, Letchworth

10.00am: Arrive at Flag Fen site, Northey Road, Peterborough. Coffees/teas available at Visitor Centre.

10.30am – 12.30pm: Guided tour in 2 groups of the site: the Causeway remains, the round house and droveway, the mere, the Roman road, the museum with many artefacts & the logboats from Must Farm

12.30pm – 1.20pm: Picnic lunches, or sandwiches from the Visitor Centre café

1.20pm – 2.00pm: Drive to Crowland, c.12 miles north-east of Peterborough

2.00pm – 4.00pm: Guided tour of the present church and the extensive remains of the Abbey. Small Visitor Centre with a video on the history of the Abbey. Small shop. Tea and biscuits in the Abbey pantry

4.00pm – 4.30pm: Optional self- guided tour of the small town of Crowland

4.30pm: Depart Crowland

6.00pm: Drop point at Letchworth Library, Broadway, Letchworth

6.15pm: Drop off point in St. Mary’s Square, Hitchin

 Please wear appropriate clothing and footwear. The flat open site of Flag Fen can be very windy! The site is on the level, with grassy and gravel paths.

The Visitor Centre has a small café with a limited stock of drinks, snacks and sandwiches; we may order in advance what we need. Our 33 seater coach will have a toilet on board. The Excursion price includes entry and a guided tour at Flag Fen, and a guided tour with Tea and biscuits at Crowland Abbey.

SOCIETY FINANCES: Your Committee would very much like to fill all the 33 seats on the coach, and thus earn some income for our Society. We do urge all members to come! Non- members are welcome to come, too, thus, please do ask your family, friends and neighbours to join us!

Download the booking form here.

Stonehenge

Aerial photograph of the then newly dualled A505 Baldock-Royston road cutting through the chalk escarpment at Slip End, Ashwell, looking north. Parch-marks during that summer’s drought show peri-glacial geological features, especially the wide river-like feature running from top to bottom in middle of picture, with its profile clearly visible in the cutting. Also, four ring-ditches of ploughed-out Prehistoric burial mounds to the left. In the right foreground is a rectangular ditched enclosure on the Herts/Cambs county boundary where in October 1975 NHAS volunteers under my direction for North Herts Museums excavated several late Roman inhumation burials. Photograph by Gil Burleigh taken on the evening of 1st July 1976 from a Cessna light plane flown by Arthur Thorning, who writes: “One never knows when the past may catch up with one! I see in my flying log-book that the picture was taken from a Cessna 150 registration G-AVUH; such a small aircraft that I doubt if I could fold myself into it now!” Gil says “I certainly couldn’t!”

Ashwell Slip End Farm Skeleton 4 & skulls A-C, looking west, 24th Oct. 1975. Photo by Gil Burleigh.

All meetings are at Letchworth Free Church hall, corner of Gernon Rd and Sollershott West, 8 pm, unless stated otherwise. 

Tuesday 21st May 2019: Annual General Meeting. Gil Burleigh will present an illustrated report on the year’s fieldwork, including parch-mark sites at Barkway, Great Offley and Pirton revealed by drone photography during the summer 2018 drought and  test-pit excavations in Great Offley and Pirton, as well as test pit excavations and geophysical surveys in Ashwell. Drinks buffet £3 per person.

Autumn/Winter/Spring 2019/20:

Tuesday 24th September 2019: ‘Wimpole at the time of the Roman Conquest’, by Paddy Lambert, Project Officer, Oxford Archaeology East. 

October 2019: ‘Latest survey results from Ravensburgh Castle Iron Age Hill-Fort’, by Dr Ian Brown, Research Associate, Keble College, Oxford University.

‘A multi-period excavated site at a quarry near Peterborough’, by Greg Farnworth Jones, Project Officer.

The Basilica and Portico wall excavations at Verulamium 2018’, by James Fairbairn, Senior Project Manager, Oxford Archaeology East.

‘Excavations at Hazel End, Bishops Stortford’, by Louisa Moan, Senior Project Manager, Oxford Archaeology East.

Tuesday 17th March 2020: ‘Beacons of the Past – Hillforts in the Chilterns Landscape’ by Dr. Wendy Morrison, Project Manager, Chilterns Conservation Board.

‘Excavation of an Early Anglo-Saxon settlement at Priors Hill, Pirton’, Mark Hinman, Senior Project Manager, Pre-Construct Archaeology.

We are delighted to officially launch the Council for British Archaeology’s Festival of Archaeology website for 2019- a one-stop shop for Festival event organisers and a showcase for archaeology events from around the UK. 
Registration for the 2019 Festival of Archaeology 13-28 July is now Open! Visit https://festival.archaeologyuk.org/  to register your event. Our new website includes online registration guides and publicity materials for event organisers- so it’s even easier than before to get involved and host an event or create activities for the summer. We also have a blog page on our website and would be delighted to showcase stories of #FestivalofArch projects for 2019 and those that you may have been involved with over the years.
As part of the Council for British Archaeology’s 75th anniversarywe would also like to showcase stories of local, regional or national archaeologists. We are very proud that one of our first blogs on our website records the memories of Elisabeth Quinton, from Alberta Canada, who volunteered on a CBA dig in Canada in the 1950s. Her work on this dig inspired her lifelong interest in archaeology and, as she says, the CBA was the “catalyst for part of my interest in history.” We will be sharing more details of the 2019 Festival of Archaeology events over the coming weeks so please visit the CBA’s Festival of Archaeology website https://festival.archaeologyuk.org/ or follow us on social media.
Twitter: @archaeologyuk
Facebook: Archaeologyuk
Or you can contact us at festival2019@archaeologyuk.org with any enquiries.
Best wishes, Gillian Waters
Festival Co-ordinator
As part of Hitchin Festival July 2019 Hitchin Historical Society will be hosting its third biennial History Day on Saturday July 13th 2019 at Church House Hitchin from 10am to 4 pm. It provides an opportunity to meet with other local heritage groups and the general public.
There is no charge to participating organisations and admission is free to the public.
Summer Field Trip
Message from Committee member Liz Hunter:
Everyone
The 2019 Summer Field Excursion: At long last, I have made some progress on this.   Over the May Bank Holiday weekend, when up in Stamford with my sister, I visited both Crowland Abbey and Flag Fen. Both are possible sites for us to visit. At both sites, there was no one able to make a booking…..  However, I now have a name and an email address and/or a phone number for the two people I need to communicate with – HOORAY!
The booking for Flag Fen can only be done via a ‘Volunteer’ member of staff at the ‘Vivacity’ department  (Leisure and Heritage ) of Peterborough City Council; Janet works only on a Thursday…………  (I expected to go through the Museum Service in the city……..)
I think my plan for the day will be as follows:-
8.15/8.30am: Leave Hitchin/Letchworth
10.00am: Arrive Flag Fen. Coffee break for c. 10/15 minutes; probable need to order in advance?
Guided tour for c.90 minutes of the site.
12 noon: Picnic lunches on the terrace outside the Visitor Centre (not nearly enough chairs/may have to eat sitting on the grass or in the coach; will query this) The VC cafe is v. small; sells sandwiches and snacks, hot and cold drinks; only 16 chairs at 4 tables)
12.45pm: Drive to Crowland; not an easy route – allow c. 45 mins?? Narrow streets for a coach in Crowland, small coach park adjacent to the carpark at the Abbey.
1.45pm: Guided tour of the Abbey and its former extent, now the churchyard; impressive and interesting history, good guidebook; short video in v. small Visitor Centre; well informed volunteer guides.
c. 3.30pm: possibly Tea in the small Pantry in the Abbey, or in the hotel across the road from the Abbey, or at a Tearoom, a 5 minute walk from the Abbey.
I will give this task some priority this week, so that I can give our members the fullest possible details at the AGM.
DATES:
The guides at Crowland thought that a visit on a Sunday afternoon would NOT be possible, due to church services and volunteer guides’ other commitments.  Thus we may/will have to visit on a Saturday, in July or August.
News from Kris Lockyear, Welwyn Archaeological Society
I am pleased to announce that a joint project between the Society, Welwyn Hatfield Museums, the St Albans branch of the Young Archaeologist’s Club and the Community Archaeology Geophysics Group has received a £9,600 grant for a project based around the Dicket Mead and Lockley’s Roman villas.  The project will involve undertaking some geophysical survey as well as digging some test pits on the west side of the motorway, and looking at artefacts from the original excavations. The project will conclude with an exhibition at Mill Green at which the Society will be putting up a display to celebrate the Society’s 60th anniversary as well as showing the results of this project. I hope members will be willing to join in this exciting project and make it a great success.
For more details see the press release: https://one.welhat.gov.uk/RomanBathslotteryfund
Best wishes, Kris.
Also from Kris: if you are interested in getting some experience of geophysical survey the Community Archaeology Geophysics Group will almost certainly be working at Verulamium again this August. See hertsgeosurvey.wordpress.com for the results of our work.

Subscriptions

2019/20 Subscriptions become due on 1st June 2019. Please renew. The Society cannot continue to function without all members’ subscriptions. In particular, lecturers fees and expenses and hall hire have to come from subscriptions. Lack of sufficient income from subscriptions may result in fewer lectures. It’s up to us members. Thank you to all who have paid your subscription and renewed your membership.

Outstanding subscriptions may be paid in person at any meeting when membership cards can usually be issued also. Otherwise subscription cheques may be posted to Diane Burleigh, NHAS, 10 Cromwell Way, Pirton, Hitchin, Herts SG5 3RD.

Please note 2018/19 Membership cards are now available and may be collected at any of our lectures.

Adult £19, Family £24, Concessions (over 65, under 16), £10.

Non-members are welcome at any of our meetings. There will be a charge of £4 for entry.

Please renew your subscription otherwise you may be removed from our membership and circulation lists.

Thank you.www.nharchsoc.org

Aerial photograph of the then newly dualled A505 Baldock-Royston road cutting through the chalk escarpment at Slip End, Ashwell, looking north. Parch-marks during that summer’s drought show peri-glacial geological features, especially the wide river-like feature running from top to bottom in middle of picture, with its profile clearly visible in the cutting. Also, four ring-ditches of ploughed-out Prehistoric burial mounds to the left. In the right foreground is a rectangular ditched enclosure on the Herts/Cambs county boundary where in October 1975 NHAS volunteers under my direction for North Herts Museums excavated several late Roman inhumation burials. Photograph by Gil Burleigh taken on the evening of 1st July 1976 from a Cessna light plane flown by Arthur Thorning, who writes: “One never knows when the past may catch up with one! I see in my flying log-book that the picture was taken from a Cessna 150 registration G-AVUH; such a small aircraft that I doubt if I could fold myself into it now!” Gil says “I certainly couldn’t!”

.

Ashwell Slip End Farm Skeleton 4 & skulls A-C, looking west, 24th Oct. 1975. Photo by Gil Burleigh.

All meetings are at Letchworth Free Church hall, corner of Gernon Rd and Sollershott West, 8 pm, unless stated otherwise.

Revising_the_definition_of_treasure_in_the_Treasure_Act_1996_and_revising_the_related_codes_of_practice.pdf

Aerial photograph of the then newly dualled A505 Baldock-Royston road cutting through the chalk escarpment at Slip End, Ashwell, looking north. Parch-marks during that summer’s drought show peri-glacial geological features, especially the wide river-like feature running from top to bottom in middle of picture, with its profile clearly visible in the cutting. Also, four ring-ditches of ploughed-out Prehistoric burial mounds to the left. In the right foreground is a rectangular ditched enclosure on the Herts/Cambs county boundary where in October 1975 NHAS volunteers under my direction for North Herts Museums excavated several late Roman inhumation burials. Photograph by Gil Burleigh taken on the evening of 1st July 1976 from a Cessna light plane flown by Arthur Thorning, who writes: “One never knows when the past may catch up with one! I see in my flying log-book that the picture was taken from a Cessna 150 registration G-AVUH; such a small aircraft that I doubt if I could fold myself into it now!” Gil says “I certainly couldn’t!”

Ashwell Slip End Farm Skeleton 4 & skulls A-C, looking west, 24th Oct. 1975. Photo by Gil Burleigh.

All meetings are at Letchworth Free Church hall, corner of Gernon Rd and Sollershott West, 8 pm, unless stated otherwise. 

Tuesday 16th April 2019: ‘ What we can learn from excavated human remains’, Laura Dodd, Project Officer and human bone specialist, KDK Archaeology.

Tuesday 21st May: Annual General Meeting. Gil Burleigh will present an illustrated report on the year’s fieldwork, including parch-mark sites at Barkway, Great Offley and Pirton revealed by drone photography during the summer 2018 drought and  test-pit excavations in Great Offley and Pirton, as well as test pit excavations and geophysical surveys in Ashwell.

Autumn/Winter 2019/20:

October 2019: ‘Latest survey results from Ravensburgh Castle Iron Age Hill-Fort’, by Dr Ian Brown, Research Associate, Keble College, Oxford University.

‘Wimpole at the time of the Roman Conquest’, by Paddy Lambert, Project Officer, Oxford Archaeology East.

‘A multi-period excavated site at a quarry near Peterborough’, by Greg Farnworth Jones, Project Officer.

‘The Basilica and Portico wall excavations at Verulamium 2018’, by James Fairbairn, Senior Project Manager, Oxford Archaeology East.

‘Excavations at Hazel End, Bishops Stortford’, by Louisa Moan, Senior Project Manager, Oxford Archaeology East.

‘Beacons of the Past – the Hillforts of the Chilterns Landscape’ by Ed Peveler or Dr. Wendy Morrison, members of the project team.

‘Excavation of an Early Anglo-Saxon settlement at Priors Hill, Pirton’, Mark Hinman, Senior Project Manager, Pre-Construct Archaeology.

Treasure Act 1996:
A Government Public Consultation is currently underway with a view to revising it and its associated codes of practice. The consultation closes for comments on 30th April 2019.

Festival of Archaeology 2019
We are delighted to officially launch the Council for British Archaeology’s Festival of Archaeology website for 2019- a one-stop shop for Festival event organisers and a showcase for archaeology events from around the UK. Registration for the 2019 Festival of Archaeology 13-28 July is now open! Visit https://festival.archaeologyuk.org/ to register your event. Our new website includes online registration guides and publicity materials for event organisers – so it’s even easier than before to get involved and host an event or create activities for the summer. We also have a blog page on our website and would be delighted to showcase stories of #FestivalofArch projects for 2019 and those that you may have been involved with over the years.
As part of the Council for British Archaeology’s 75th anniversary we would also like to showcase stories of local, regional or national archaeologists. We are very proud that one of our first blogs on our website records the memories of Elisabeth Quinton, from Alberta Canada, who volunteered on a CBA dig in Canada in the 1950s. Her work on this dig inspired her lifelong interest in archaeology and, as she says, the CBA was the “catalyst for part of my interest in history.”
We will be sharing more details of the 2019 Festival of Archaeology events over the coming weeks so please visit the CBA’s Festival of Archaeology website https://festival.archaeologyuk.org/ or follow us on social media.
Twitter: @archaeologyuk
Facebook: Archaeologyuk
Or you can contact us at festival2019@archaeologyuk.org with any enquiries.
Best wishes,
Gillian Waters
Festival Co-ordinator

As part of Hitchin Festival July 2019 Hitchin Historical Society will be hosting its third biennial History Day on Saturday July 13th 2019 at Church House Hitchin from 10am to 4 pm.It provides an opportunity to meet with other local heritage groups and the general public. There is no charge to participating organisations and admission is free to the public.  Please let me know if you wish to book a table.
I will provide practical information later.
Kind regards
Gerry Tidy

Subscriptions

2018/19 Subscriptions became due on 1st June 2018. Please renew. The Society cannot continue to function without all members’ subscriptions. In particular, lecturers fees and expenses and hall hire have to come from subscriptions. Lack of sufficient income from subscriptions may result in fewer lectures. It’s up to us members. Thank you to all who have paid your subscription and renewed your membership.

Outstanding subscriptions may be paid in person at any meeting when membership cards can usually be issued also. Otherwise subscription cheques may be posted to Diane Burleigh, NHAS, 10 Cromwell Way, Pirton, Hitchin, Herts SG5 3RD.

Please note 2018/19 Membership cards are now available and may be collected at any of our lectures.

Adult £19, Family £24, Concessions (over 65, under 16), £10.

Non-members are welcome at any of our meetings. There will be a charge of £4 for entry.

Please renew your subscription otherwise you may be removed from our membership and circulation lists.
Thank you.

Stonehenge

All meetings are at Letchworth Free Church hall, corner of Gernon Rd and Sollershott West, 8 pm, unless stated otherwise.

Tuesday 19th February 2019: ‘A Late Bronze Age – Early Iron Age Settlement and Prehistoric Precursor to Roman Ermine Street: Excavations at North Buntingford’, by Matt Jones, Project Officer, Pre-Construct Archaeology (Cambridge).

Tuesday 5th March 2019: ‘Excavations at Northstowe, Cambridgeshire: Iron Age, Roman, Saxon and Medieval settlements’, by Alison Dickins, Senior Project Manager, Archaeology Unit, University of Cambridge.

Sunday 7th April 2019: Field Trip to Ravensburgh Castle Iron Age hillfort, Hexton, Herts. Kindly arranged by our Member, Derek Turner, with the Bedfordshire Geology Group. Details to be confirmed.

Tuesday 16th April 2019: ‘ What we can learn from excavated human remains’, Laura Dodd, Project Officer and human bone specialist, KDK Archaeology.

Tuesday 21st May: Annual General Meeting. Gil Burleigh will present an illustrated report on the year’s fieldwork, including parch-mark sites at Barkway, Great Offley and Pirton revealed by drone photography during the summer 2018 drought and  test-pit excavations in Great Offley and Pirton.

Autumn/Winter 2019/20:

‘A multi-period excavated site at a quarry near Peterborough’, by Greg Farnworth Jones, Project Officer.

The Basilica and Portico wall excavations at Verulamium 2018’, by James Fairbairn, Senior Project Manager, Oxford Archaeology East.

‘Excavations at Hazel End, Bishops Stortford’, by Louisa Moan, Senior Project Manager, Oxford Archaeology East.

‘Beacons of the Past – the Hillforts of the Chilterns Landscape’ by a member of the project team.

‘Excavation of an Early Anglo-Saxon settlement at Priors Hill, Pirton’, Mark Hinman, Senior Project Manager, Pre-Construct Archaeology.

STOP PRESS: Nicholas Maddex, Chairman of the Codicote Local History Society, invites our members to  hear Mark Landon talking about his work in Iron Age and Roman Braughing, particularly on the Iron Age coins and coin moulds,  at their meeting on Tuesday 12th February at 8 p.m, Peace Memorial Hall, High St, Codicote. If you know anyone who might be interested in attending do please let them know. All are welcome, for a small charge.

Dea Senuna: Treasure, Cult and Ritual at Ashwell, Hertfordshire by Ralph Jackson and Gilbert Burleigh, published in March 2018, has been re-printed and is still available for sale at the British Museum bookshop:

http://www.britishmuseumshoponline.org/invt/cmc91947

The PDF version is available to see/browse/read/download at the British Museum website:

http://www.britishmuseum.org/research/publications/research_publications_series.aspx

Click on the drop-down menu for Research Publications and you will find the Dea Senuna PDF. 

The article on ‘Ashwell’s Lost Roman Goddess’, published in Hertfordshire Life magazine in July 2018 is available online (minus one or two photographs): http://www.hertfordshirelife.co.uk/home/history-the-goddess-of-Ashwell-1-5646728

A couple of published academic reviews of the Dea Senuna volume are attached, one short, the other an article, together with some very kind and generous comments to me from Professor Carenza Lewis of the University of Lincoln.

Treasure Act 1996: A Government Public Consultation is currently underway with a view to revising it and its associated codes of practice. The consultation closes for comments on 30th April 2019. Details attached.

Our sincere thanks go to David Dorkings, of St Alban’s, a retired surveyor, for donating his set of ranging poles to the Society. David is a member of the Watford & District Industrial History Society – “your local society for talks, films and trips about industrial history nationwide and beyond”. See www.wadihs.org.uk

THE BRITISH LIBRARY

Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms- Art, Word, War

Now to 19th February 2019.

600 years. 180 spectacular treasures. A once-in-a-generation exhibition.

Treasures from the British Library’s own collection, including the beautifully illuminated Lindisfarne Gospels, Beowulf and Bede’s Ecclesiastical History, sit alongside stunning finds from Sutton Hoo and the Staffordshire Hoard. The world-famous Domesday Book offers its unrivalled depiction of the landscape of late Anglo-Saxon England while Codex Amiatinus, a giant Northumbrian Bible taken to Italy in 716, returns to England for the first time in 1300 years.

The people of the Anglo-Saxon kingdoms tell their story, in their own words. Explore the beginnings of the English language and English literature. Read some of the earliest-surviving words inscribed in English on objects large and small. Come face-to-face with manuscripts of Old English poetry and prose and the first letter written in English. Wonder at the wit and wisdom in the Anglo-Saxon kingdoms.

Entrance £16, British Library Members Free. It is advisable to book in advance, on-line or 0207 412639

THE BRITISH MUSEUM

I am Ashurbanipal king of the world, king of Assyria

8 November 2018 – 24 February 2019

★★★★★
‘Extraordinary’
The Evening Standard

★★★★★
‘Fabulous’
The Times

★★★★★
‘Spectacular’
Londonist

★★★★
‘Staggeringly beautiful’
Time Out

★★★★
‘a gripping fusion of beauty and brutality’
The Telegraph

★★★★
‘blockbuster recreation of Assyria’s might’
The Guardian

Warrior. Scholar. Empire builder. King slayer. Lion hunter. Librarian.

King Ashurbanipal of Assyria (r. 669–c. 631 BC) was the most powerful man on earth. He described himself in inscriptions as ‘king of the world’, and his reign from the city of Nineveh (now in northern Iraq) marked the high point of the Assyrian empire, which stretched from the shores of the eastern Mediterranean to the mountains of western Iran.

More about the exhibition

Ashurbanipal proved himself worthy of protecting his people through displays of strength, such as hunting lions. Like many rulers of the ancient world, he liked to boast about his victories in battle and brutally crushed his enemies. However, this vast and diverse empire was controlled through more than just brute force. Ashurbanipal used his skills as a scholar, diplomat and strategist to become one of Assyria’s greatest rulers.

Despite his long and successful reign, Ashurbanipal’s death is shrouded in mystery. Shortly afterwards, the Assyrian empire fell and the great city of Nineveh was destroyed in 612 BC, its ruins lost to history until the 1840s. Their rediscovery has allowed us to piece together a portrait of the powerful and complex ruler that was Ashurbanipal.

This major exhibition tells the story of Ashurbanipal through the British Museum’s unparalleled collection of Assyrian treasures and rare loans. Step into Ashurbanipal’s world through displays that evoke the splendour of his palace, with its spectacular sculptures, sumptuous furnishings and exotic gardens. Marvel at the workings of Ashurbanipal’s great library, the first in the world to be created with the ambition of housing all knowledge under one roof. Come face to face with one of history’s greatest forgotten kings.

Who was Ashurbanipal?

Introducing the Assyrians

Sacrilege! Leading archaeologist speaks out on centenary of Stonehenge gift
Expressway legacy threat mars centenary of Stonehenge donation
Friday 26th October was the centenary of the gift of Stonehenge to the nation by Sir Cecil and Lady Chubb. This weekend, English Heritage is marking the occasion with a specially commissioned tea party designed by Jeremy Deller and an installation of his work, “Sacrilege”, an almost life-sized inflatable Stonehenge. A joyous public celebration for some, but for many others it could mark impending sacrilege for the nation’s most famous World Heritage Site.   A distinguished archaeologist speaks out against the Stonehenge tunnel
Professor Mike Parker Pearson, leading expert in British Neolithic archaeology, speaks out about the Stonehenge tunnel in a newly released video to share his profound concerns.  At barely 3km long the tunnel would be too short within a World Heritage Site that is more than 5km across, full of prehistoric monuments.  Mike reminds us that the UNESCO World Heritage Site is “adesignation of an entire landscape. It’s one of the few places, not just in Britain but in the World, where you can see a special, sacred landscape developed over thousands of years.”
Professor Mike Parker Pearson “Stonehenge tunnel sets a bad precedent
http://https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=qLGBBTt1JnI
Will the UK Government finally come to its senses and re-consider the A303 road-widening scheme and the damage it would do to our World Heritage Site? It isn’t too late to call a halt and heed the advice of UNESCO and other internationally acknowledged experts.
A less damaging solution would properly and rightly protect the remarkable surroundings of Stonehenge about which we now know so much more than we did a hundred years ago.
Short 1 minute clip of the video can be seen here
Full briefing about A303 Stonehenge scheme
Sign up here to receive updates from the Planning Inspectorate and register your interest in having a say about the Stonehenge Tunnel scheme.

Subscriptions

2018/19 Subscriptions became due on 1st June 2018. Please renew. The Society cannot continue to function without all members’ subscriptions. In particular, lecturers fees and expenses and hall hire have to come from subscriptions. Lack of sufficient income from subscriptions may result in fewer lectures. It’s up to us members. Thank you to all who have paid your subscription and renewed your membership.

Outstanding subscriptions may be paid in person at any meeting when membership cards can usually be issued also. Otherwise subscription cheques may be posted to Diane Burleigh, NHAS, 10 Cromwell Way, Pirton, Hitchin, Herts SG5 3RD.

Please note 2018/19 Membership cards are now available and may be collected at any of our lectures.

Adult £19, Family £24, Concessions (over 65, under 16), £10.

Non-members are welcome at any of our meetings. There will be a charge of £4 for entry.

Please renew your subscription otherwise you may be removed from our membership and circulation lists.

Thank you.

NORTH HERTFORDSHIRE ARCHAEOLOGICAL SOCIETY

All meetings are at Letchworth Free Church hall, corner of Gernon Rd and Sollershott West, 8 pm, unless stated otherwise.

Tuesday 22nd January 2019: ‘Raising the Dead – Kingly curves and Astronomers’ noses: the recent trend for celebrity exhumations’, by Dr. Joseph Elders, Major Projects and Archaeology Officer, Cathedral and Church Buildings Division, Church of England.

Tuesday 19th February 2019: ‘Excavations at Buntingford, Hertfordshire’, by Matt Jones, Project Officer, Pre-Construct Archaeology.

Tuesday 5th March 2019: ‘Excavations at Northstowe, Cambridgeshire’, by Alison Dickins, Senior Project Manager, Archaeology Unit, University of Cambridge.

Sunday 7th April 2019: Field Trip to Ravensburgh Castle Iron Age hillfort, Hexton, Herts. Kindly arranged by our Member, Derek Turner, with the Bedfordshire Geology Group. Details to be confirmed.

Tuesday 16th April 2019: ‘ What we can learn from excavated human remains’, Laura Dodd, Project Officer and human bone specialist, KDK Archaeology.

Tuesday 21st May: Annual General Meeting. Gil Burleigh will present an illustrated report on the year’s fieldwork, including parch-mark sites at Barkway, Great Offley and Pirton revealed by drone photography during the summer 2018 drought and  test-pit excavations in Great Offley and Pirton.

Autumn/Winter 2019/20:

‘A multi-period excavated site at a quarry near Peterborough’, by Greg Farnworth Jones, Project Officer.

The Basilica and Portico wall excavations at Verulamium 2018’, by James Fairbairn, Senior Project Manager, Oxford Archaeology East.

‘Excavations at Hazel End, Bishops Stortford’, by Louisa Moan, Senior Project Manager, Oxford Archaeology East.

‘Beacons of the Past – the Hillforts of the Chilterns Landscape’ by a member of the project team.

‘Excavation of an Early Anglo-Saxon settlement at Priors Hill, Pirton’, Mark Hinman, Senior Project Manager, Pre-Construct Archaeology.

Dea Senuna: Treasure, Cult and Ritual at Ashwell, Hertfordshire by Ralph Jackson and Gilbert Burleigh, published in March 2018, has been re-printed and is still available for sale at the British Museum bookshop:

http://www.britishmuseumshoponline.org/invt/cmc91947

The PDF version is available to see/browse/read/download at the British Museum website:

http://www.britishmuseum.org/research/publications/research_publications_series.aspx

Click on the drop-down menu for Research Publications and you will find the Dea Senuna PDF. 

The article on ‘Ashwell’s Lost Roman Goddess’, published in Hertfordshire Life magazine in July 2018 is available online (minus one or two photographs): http://www.hertfordshirelife.co.uk/home/history-the-goddess-of-Ashwell-1-5646728 

  Sacrilege! Leading archaeologist speaks out on centenary of Stonehenge gift     Expressway legacy threat mars centenary of Stonehenge donation Friday 26th October was the centenary of the gift of Stonehenge to the nation by Sir Cecil and Lady Chubb. This weekend, English Heritage is marking the occasion with a specially commissioned tea party designed by Jeremy Deller and an installation of his work, “Sacrilege”, an almost life-sized inflatable Stonehenge. A joyous public celebration for some, but for many others it could mark impending sacrilege for the nation’s most famous World Heritage Site.   A distinguished archaeologist speaks out against the Stonehenge tunnel Professor Mike Parker Pearson, leading expert in British Neolithic archaeology, speaks out about the Stonehenge tunnel in a newly released video to share his profound concerns.  At barely 3km long the tunnel would be too short within a World Heritage Site that is more than 5km across, full of prehistoric monuments.  Mike reminds us that the UNESCO World Heritage Site is “a designation of an entire landscape. It’s one of the few places, not just in Britain but in the World, where you can see a special, sacred landscape developed over thousands of years.”   Professor Mike Parker Pearson “Stonehenge tunnel sets a bad precedent”   http://https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=qLGBBTt1JnI
Will the UK Government finally come to its senses and re-consider the A303 road-widening scheme and the damage it would do to our World Heritage Site? It isn’t too late to call a halt and heed the advice of UNESCO and other internationally acknowledged experts.

A less damaging solution would properly and rightly protect the remarkable surroundings of Stonehenge about which we now know so much more than we did a hundred years ago.

Short 1 minute clip of the video can be seen here   Full briefing about A303 Stonehenge scheme
Sign up here to receive updates from the Planning Inspectorate and register your interest in having a say about the Stonehenge Tunnel scheme.

THE BRITISH MUSEUM

I object: Ian Hislop’s search for dissent


6 September 2018 – 20 January 2019


Members free

We’ve invited Private Eye Editor Ian Hislop (you know, the one from Have I Got News For You) to have a rummage around in the stores. On his search, he’s hand-picked a range of intriguing objects that explore the idea of dissent, subversion and satire (but don’t worry, we made him wear gloves).

A wide variety of objects will be on display in the exhibition – from graffiti on a Babylonian brick to a banknote with hidden rude words, from satirical Turkish shadow puppets to a recently acquired ‘pussy’ hat worn on a women’s march. See what tales these objects tell – sometimes deadly serious, often humorous, always with conviction. Unlock the messages and symbols these people used, and get closer to understanding them. The British Museum doesn’t escape ridicule either – the joke has been on us on more than one occasion.

This history in 100(ish) objects shows that people have always challenged and undermined orthodox views in order to enable change. They even did so despite the establishment usually taking a pretty dim view – for most of history you could expect a gruesome punishment, up to and including death, for this kind of subversive behaviour. This suggests that maybe we are programmed to dissent – it’s just part of who we are. Ultimately, the exhibition will show that questioning authority, registering protest and generally objecting are an integral part of what makes us human.

The Citi exhibition

I object
Ian Hislop’s
search for
dissent


6 September 2018 – 20 January 2019


Members free

Book tickets


Supported by

Citi Group

★★★★★
‘a rare delight’
The Times

History, as somebody wise once said, is just one damned thing after another. But is it really? Who decides what is ‘history’?

Traditionally, the answer is ‘the winners’. But in this exhibition we’re setting out to investigate what the other people had to say – the downtrodden, the forgotten, the protestors. They left their marks on objects, just as the official view has, and these dissenting objects are also to be found in the British Museum’s collection. You just need to know where to look…

We realise that uncovering a treasure trove of dissenting objects can be tricky. Luckily, we’ve found someone who can help. We’ve invited Private Eye Editor Ian Hislop (you know, the one from Have I Got News For You) to have a rummage around in the stores. On his search, he’s hand-picked a range of intriguing objects that explore the idea of dissent, subversion and satire (but don’t worry, we made him wear gloves).

A wide variety of objects are on display in the exhibition – from graffiti on a Babylonian brick to a banknote with hidden rude words, from satirical Turkish shadow puppets to a recently acquired ‘pussy’ hat worn on a women’s march. See what tales these objects tell – sometimes deadly serious, often humorous, always with conviction. Unlock the messages and symbols these people used, and get closer to understanding them. The British Museum doesn’t escape ridicule either – the joke has been on us on more than one occasion.

This history in 100(ish) objects shows that people have always challenged and undermined orthodox views in order to enable change. They even did so despite the establishment usually taking a pretty dim view – for most of history you could expect a gruesome punishment, up to and including death, for this kind of subversive behaviour. This suggests that maybe we are programmed to dissent – it’s just part of who we are. Ultimately, the exhibition will show that questioning authority, registering protest and generally objecting are an integral part of what makes us human.

Accompanies a series on BBC Radio 4.

Get the exhibition book and shop the range here.

Ian Hislop’s Objecting objects

A bluffer’s guide to dissent in 7 objects

THE BRITISH LIBRARY

Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms- Art, Word, War

Now to 19th February 2019.

600 years. 180 spectacular treasures. A once-in-a-generation exhibition.

Treasures from the British Library’s own collection, including the beautifully illuminated Lindisfarne Gospels, Beowulf and Bede’s Ecclesiastical History, sit alongside stunning finds from Sutton Hoo and the Staffordshire Hoard. The world-famous Domesday Book offers its unrivalled depiction of the landscape of late Anglo-Saxon England while Codex Amiatinus, a giant Northumbrian Bible taken to Italy in 716, returns to England for the first time in 1300 years.

The people of the Anglo-Saxon kingdoms tell their story, in their own words. Explore the beginnings of the English language and English literature. Read some of the earliest-surviving words inscribed in English on objects large and small. Come face-to-face with manuscripts of Old English poetry and prose and the first letter written in English. Wonder at the wit and wisdom in the Anglo-Saxon kingdoms.

Entrance £16, British Library Members Free. It is advisable to book in advance, on-line or 0207 412639

THE BRITISH MUSEUM

I am Ashurbanipal
king of the world,
king of Assyria


8 November 2018 –
24 February 2019






★★★★★
‘Extraordinary’
The Evening Standard

★★★★★
‘Fabulous’
The Times

★★★★★
‘Spectacular’
Londonist

★★★★
‘Staggeringly beautiful’
Time Out

★★★★
‘a gripping fusion of beauty and brutality’
The Telegraph

★★★★
‘blockbuster recreation of Assyria’s might’
The Guardian

Warrior. Scholar. Empire builder. King slayer. Lion hunter. Librarian.

King Ashurbanipal of Assyria (r. 669–c. 631 BC) was the most powerful man on earth. He described himself in inscriptions as ‘king of the world’, and his reign from the city of Nineveh (now in northern Iraq) marked the high point of the Assyrian empire, which stretched from the shores of the eastern Mediterranean to the mountains of western Iran.

More about the exhibition

Ashurbanipal proved himself worthy of protecting his people through displays of strength, such as hunting lions. Like many rulers of the ancient world, he liked to boast about his victories in battle and brutally crushed his enemies. However, this vast and diverse empire was controlled through more than just brute force. Ashurbanipal used his skills as a scholar, diplomat and strategist to become one of Assyria’s greatest rulers.

Despite his long and successful reign, Ashurbanipal’s death is shrouded in mystery. Shortly afterwards, the Assyrian empire fell and the great city of Nineveh was destroyed in 612 BC, its ruins lost to history until the 1840s. Their rediscovery has allowed us to piece together a portrait of the powerful and complex ruler that was Ashurbanipal.

This major exhibition tells the story of Ashurbanipal through the British Museum’s unparalleled collection of Assyrian treasures and rare loans. Step into Ashurbanipal’s world through displays that evoke the splendour of his palace, with its spectacular sculptures, sumptuous furnishings and exotic gardens. Marvel at the workings of Ashurbanipal’s great library, the first in the world to be created with the ambition of housing all knowledge under one roof. Come face to face with one of history’s greatest forgotten kings.



Who was Ashurbanipal?

Introducing the Assyrians

Subscriptions

2018/19 Subscriptions became due on 1st June 2018. Please renew. The Society cannot continue to function without all members’ subscriptions. In particular, lecturers fees and expenses and hall hire have to come from subscriptions. Lack of sufficient income from subscriptions may result in fewer lectures. It’s up to us members. Thank you to all who have paid your subscription and renewed your membership.

Outstanding subscriptions may be paid in person at any meeting when membership cards can usually be issued also. Otherwise subscription cheques may be posted to Diane Burleigh, NHAS, 10 Cromwell Way, Pirton, Hitchin, Herts SG5 3RD.

Please note 2018/19 Membership cards are now available and may be collected at any of our lectures.

Adult £19, Family £24, Concessions (over 65, under 16), £10.

Non-members are welcome at any of our meetings. There will be a charge of £4 for entry.

Please renew your subscription otherwise you may be removed from our membership and circulation lists.

Thank you.

www.nharchsoc.org

NORTH HERTFORDSHIRE ARCHAEOLOGICAL SOCIETY

Newsletter: 28th November 2018

Tuesday 4th December 2018: Members Xmas evening with buffet, wine and other refreshments, £3 per head. Mark Stevenson, Archaeology Advisor (South London), National Planning Group, Historic England, will give a talk on ‘The Archaeology of a World Heritage Site: Greenwich’. All lectures to be held at Letchworth Free Church hall, 8 pm.

Tuesday 19th February 2019: ‘Excavations at Buntingford, Hertfordshire’, by Matt Jones, Project Officer, Pre-Construct Archaeology.

Tuesday 5th March 2019: ‘Excavations at North Stowe, Cambridgeshire’, by Alison Dickins, Project Manager, Archaeology Unit, University of Cambridge.

Tuesday 16th April 2019: ‘ What we can learn from excavated human remains’, Laura Dodd, KDK Archaeology.

Tuesday 21st May: Annual General Meeting. Gil Burleigh will present an illustrated report on the year’s fieldwork, including parch-mark sites revealed by drone photography during the summer 2018 drought and renewed test-pit excavations in Pirton.

Autumn 2019: ‘A multi-period excavated site at a quarry near Peterborough’, by Greg Farnworth Jones, Project Officer.

Kris Lockyear writes:

Dear All,

some of you might be interested in the one day conference on archaeological geophysics being held at the Geological Society in Piccadilly on the 4th December. See for details and a link. I am presenting a poster on our work at Verulamium. Cost is £25 concessions, £30 full with lunch and coffees.

Best wishes, Kris.

Dea Senuna: Treasure, Cult and Ritual at Ashwell, Hertfordshire book by Ralph Jackson and Gilbert Burleigh has been re-printed and is still available for sale at the BM (). It would make a nice Christmas present if you don’t have a copy yet!

The article on ‘Ashwell’s Lost Roman Goddess’, published in Hertfordshire Life magazine in July is now available online (minus one or two photographs):

Sacrilege! Leading archaeologist speaks out on centenary of Stonehenge gift

Expressway legacy threat mars centenary of Stonehenge donation

Friday 26th October was the centenary of the gift of Stonehenge to the nation by Sir Cecil and Lady Chubb. This weekend, English Heritage is marking the occasion with a specially commissioned tea party designed by Jeremy Deller and an installation of his work, “Sacrilege”, an almost life-sized inflatable Stonehenge.

A joyous public celebration for some, but for many others it could mark impending sacrilege for the nation’s most famous World Heritage Site.

A distinguished archaeologist speaks out against the Stonehenge tunnel

Professor Mike Parker Pearson, leading expert in British Neolithic archaeology, speaks out about the Stonehenge tunnel in a newly released video to share his profound concerns. At barely 3km long the tunnel would be too short within a World Heritage Site that is more than 5km across, full of prehistoric monuments. Mike reminds us that the UNESCO World Heritage Site is “a designation of an entire landscape. It’s one of the few places, not just in Britain but in the World, where you can see a special, sacred landscape developed over thousands of years.”

Professor Mike Parker Pearson “Stonehenge tunnel sets a bad precedent
http://https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=qLGBBTt1JnI
Will the UK Government finally come to its senses and re-consider the A303 road-widening scheme and the damage it would do to our World Heritage Site? It isn’t too late to call a halt and heed the advice of UNESCO and other internationally acknowledged experts.

A less damaging solution would properly and rightly protect the remarkable surroundings of Stonehenge about which we now know so much more than we did a hundred years ago.

Short 1 minute clip of the video can be seen here

Full briefing about A303 Stonehenge scheme
Sign up here to receive updates from the Planning Inspectorate and register your interest in having a say about the Stonehenge Tunnel scheme.

THE BRITISH MUSEUM

I object: Ian Hislop’s search for dissent

WAS.Autumn 2018 for email.docx

NORTH HERTFORDSHIRE ARCHAEOLOGICAL SOCIETY

 Newsletter: October 2018

We’re living a little bit hand to mouth at the moment as regards lectures/speakers. Our next lectures are:

Tuesday 30th October 2018:  ‘Royston Cave and the Knights Templar, a talk by Keith Fitzpatrick-Matthews, Curator, North Hertfordshire Museum. Letchworth Free Church hall, 8 pm.

Tuesday 20th November 2018: ‘Recent Archaeological Discoveries in Pirton’ by Gil Burleigh. Letchworth Free Church hall 8 pm.

Tuesday 4th December 2018: Members Xmas evening with buffet, wine and other refreshments, £3 per head. Mark Stevenson, Archaeology Advisor (South London), National Planning Group, Historic England, will give a talk on ‘The Archaeology of a World Heritage Site: Greenwich’. Letchworth Free Church hall, 8 pm.

In the New Year so far we have lined up James Fairbairn of Oxford Archaeology East to talk on his excavations this year in Verulamium and Alison Dickins of Cambridge University Archaeological unit to talk about archaeology in Cambridgeshire (dates to be arranged). Our members, Dan Phillips and Kris Lockyear, have given me the names of some other potential speakers, and Sarah Talks has offered a talk. I’m grateful to all. Watch this space!

Kris Lockyear writes:

Dear All,

some of you might be interested in the one day conference on archaeological geophysics being held at the Geological Society in Piccadilly on the 4th December.  See http://www.nsgg.org.uk/meetings/ for details and a link.  I am presenting a poster on our work at Verulamium.  Cost is £25 concessions, £30 full with lunch and coffees.

Best wishes, Kris.

The article on ‘Ashwell’s Lost Roman Goddess’, published in Hertfordshire Life magazine in July is now available online (minus one or two photographs): http://www.hertfordshirelife.co.uk/home/history-the-goddess-of-Ashwell-1-5646728 

Sacrilege! Leading archaeologist speaks out on centenary of Stonehenge gift
Expressway legacy threat mars centenary of Stonehenge donation
Friday 26th October was the centenary of the gift of Stonehenge to the nation by Sir Cecil and Lady Chubb. This weekend, English Heritage is marking the occasion with a specially commissioned tea party designed by Jeremy Deller and an installation of his work, “Sacrilege”, an almost life-sized inflatable Stonehenge. A joyous public celebration for some, but for many others it could mark impending sacrilege for the nation’s most famous World Heritage Site.
A distinguished archaeologist speaks out against the Stonehenge tunnel
Professor Mike Parker Pearson, leading expert in British Neolithic archaeology, speaks out about the Stonehenge tunnel in a newly released video to share his profound concerns.  At barely 3km long the tunnel would be too short within a World Heritage Site that is more than 5km across, full of prehistoric monuments.  Mike reminds us that the UNESCO World Heritage Site is “a designation of an entire landscape. It’s one of the few places, not just in Britain but in the World, where you can see a special, sacred landscape developed over thousands of years.”   Professor Mike Parker Pearson
Stonehenge tunnel sets a bad precedent”   http://https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=qLGBBTt1JnI
Will the UK Government finally come to its senses and re-consider the A303 road-widening scheme and the damage it would do to our World Heritage Site? It isn’t too late to call a halt and heed the advice of UNESCO and other internationally acknowledged experts.

A less damaging solution would properly and rightly protect the remarkable surroundings of Stonehenge about which we now know so much more than we did a hundred years ago.

Short 1 minute clip of the video can be seen here
Full briefing about A303 Stonehenge scheme
Sign up here to receive updates from the Planning Inspectorate and register your interest in having a say about the Stonehenge Tunnel scheme.

THE BRITISH MUSEUM

Ian Hislop’s search for dissent


6 September 2018 – 20 January 2019


Members free

We’ve invited Private Eye Editor Ian Hislop (you know, the one from Have I Got News For You) to have a rummage around in the stores. On his search, he’s hand-picked a range of intriguing objects that explore the idea of dissent, subversion and satire (but don’t worry, we made him wear gloves).

A wide variety of objects will be on display in the exhibition – from graffiti on a Babylonian brick to a banknote with hidden rude words, from satirical Turkish shadow puppets to a recently acquired ‘pussy’ hat worn on a women’s march. See what tales these objects tell – sometimes deadly serious, often humorous, always with conviction. Unlock the messages and symbols these people used, and get closer to understanding them. The British Museum doesn’t escape ridicule either – the joke has been on us on more than one occasion.

This history in 100(ish) objects shows that people have always challenged and undermined orthodox views in order to enable change. They even did so despite the establishment usually taking a pretty dim view – for most of history you could expect a gruesome punishment, up to and including death, for this kind of subversive behaviour. This suggests that maybe we are programmed to dissent – it’s just part of who we are. Ultimately, the exhibition will show that questioning authority, registering protest and generally objecting are an integral part of what makes us human.

NORTH HERTFORDSHIRE MUSEUM

Hitchin Town Hall, Brand Street, Hitchin

Our Fight for the Vote

13 October -1 December. Admission Free. Closed Mondays.

This exhibition tells the story of the brave women in our area who campaigned for their belief that women should be able to vote. Elizabeth Impey of Hitchin was arrested for ‘disorderly conduct’ in 1907 just for walking three abreast outside Parliament, whereas Letchworth’s Jane Short took a more militant approach. She had previously broken the windows of both Baldock and Hitchin Post Offices, was later imprisoned for arson. Lady Constance Lytton of Knebworth House was force-fed so harshly that her health never recovered.

North Herts. Museum is fortunate in having a collection of Mrs Impey’s suffragette letters and mementoes, including her Holloway badge, her Votes for Woman rosette and scarf, and an autograph book signed by famous suffragettes including Christabel Pankhurst, Annie Kenney and Millicent Fawcett. All three came to speak at Hitchin Town Hall, causing near riots in the town – on several occasions mounted police reinforcements had to be brought in from other parts of the county.  The Impey’s house in Whinbush Road was once stormed by a large crowd of anti-suffragette men and women, and Mrs Impey was sent unpleasant anonymous postcards; the Edwardian version of a vicious Tweet.

The exhibition will be displaying photographs from our collection, as well as ones from the Museum of London. Step inside our recreated cell to get an idea of what being locked in Holloway was like. See contemporary banners and objects from our museum collection, find out the stories of local and national women fighting for the right to vote.

THE BRITISH LIBRARY

Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms- Art, Word, War

Now to 19th February 2019.

600 years. 180 spectacular treasures. A once-in-a-generation exhibition.

Treasures from the British Library’s own collection, including the beautifully illuminated Lindisfarne Gospels, Beowulf and Bede’s Ecclesiastical History, sit alongside stunning finds from Sutton Hoo and the Staffordshire Hoard. The world-famous Domesday Book offers its unrivalled depiction of the landscape of late Anglo-Saxon England while Codex Amiatinus, a giant Northumbrian Bible taken to Italy in 716, returns to England for the first time in 1300 years.

The people of the Anglo-Saxon kingdoms tell their story, in their own words. Explore the beginnings of the English language and English literature. Read some of the earliest-surviving words inscribed in English on objects large and small. Come face-to-face with manuscripts of Old English poetry and prose and the first letter written in English. Wonder at the wit and wisdom in the Anglo-Saxon kingdoms.

Entrance £16, British Library Members Free. It is advisable to book in advance, on-line or 0207 412639

Subscriptions

2018/19 Subscriptions became due on 1st June 2018. Please renew. The Society cannot continue to function without all members’ subscriptions. In particular, lecturers’ fees and expenses and hall hire have to come from subscriptions. Lack of sufficient income from subscriptions may result in fewer lectures. It’s up to us members. Thank you to all who have paid your subscription and renewedyour membership.

Outstanding subscriptions may be paid in person at any meeting when membership cards can usually be issued also. Otherwise subscription cheques may be posted to Diane Burleigh, NHAS, 10 Cromwell Way, Pirton, Hitchin, Herts SG5 3RD.

Please note 2018/19 Membership cards are now available and may be collected at any of our lectures.

Adult £19, Family £24, Concessions (over 65, under 16), £10.

Non-members are welcome at any of our meetings. There will be a charge of £4 for entry.

Please renew your subscription otherwise you may be removed from our membership and circulation lists.

Thank you.

www.nharchsoc.org

DOVER CASTLE, a defended site, high up on The White Cliffs, from the Iron Age up to World War Two, DOVER TOWN MUSEUM and the ROMAN PAINTED HOUSE.

Programme for the day:
7.30am: Pick up point in St. Mary’s Square, Hitchin
7.45am: Pick up point outside Letchworth Library, Broadway, Letchworth
10.00am: Arrive Dover Castle, at Constable’s Gate
10.00am – 4.00pm: Self guided visit of the Castle site of 80 acres:-
The Outer Bailey with the Roman Pharos of AD 50 and the Saxon church, St. Mary de Castro
The Inner Bailey with Henry 2nd’s Great Tower and its six newly refurbished medieval ‘Royal Rooms’, and, up a spiral staircase, a marvellous view across the town and out to sea
On the cliffs: The World War Two Secret Tunnels with two exhibition areas: ‘Operation Dynamo: Rescue from Dunkirk’ and the ‘Underground Hospital’
On the Castle walls: Walks along the Battlements, with views across The English Channel
DOVER TOWN MUSEUM in Market Square to see the Bronze Age Boat, the oldest known sea-going vessel, on display in the 2nd floor gallery; free entry.
The ROMAN PAINTED HOUSE of c.AD 200, in New Street: adults 3.00, concessions 2.00.
4.00pm: Depart Dover Castle, from Constable’s Gate
6.15pm: Drop off point outside Letchworth Library, Broadway, Letchworth
6.30pm: Drop off point in St. Mary’s Square, Hitchin
***********************************************
The Castle is an outdoor site on a hill, with some steep slopes on its tarmac paths. The chalk Tunnels can be chilly! Please wear appropriate clothing and footwear. A ‘Land Train’, with two covered carriages, regularly circulates around the site, and one can hop on and off, for free!
The Castle entry price includes admission to the tours of The Secret Tunnels: 60 mins. for Operation Dynamo, and 20 mins. for the Underground Hospital. Entry is on a ‘1st come, 1st served’ free flow basis.
Refreshments are available at 3 locations on the Castle site: the NAAFI Restaurant, the Great Tower Café, and the Tunnels Tea Room. To save time and money, we advise you to bring a picnic lunch!
Our coach will have a toilet on board.
SOCIETY FINANCES: Your Committee would very much like to fill all the 33 seats on the coach, and thus earn some income for the Society. We do urge all members to come! Non- members are welcome to come too, thus, please do ask your family, friends, and neighbours to join us!

Download the booking form (PDF format): NHAS7

Dea Senuna: Treasure, Cult and Ritual at Ashwell, Hertfordshire

Dea Senuna: Treasure, Cult and Ritual at Ashwell, Hertfordshire” by Ralph Jackson and Gilbert Burleigh was published by The British Museum on Monday 19th March 2018, here are some of the points made in Ralph Jackson’s and my text:

“The Ashwell Hoard is an unprecedented find both in Britain and in the wider Roman world. In Britain there has been no equivalent discovery of ‘temple treasure’ within living memory. It is paralleled only by the 18th-century finds from Barkway, Hertfordshire (1743) and Stony Stratford, Buckinghamshire (1789) and, less directly, by that said to be from Backworth, Tyne and Wear, found around the year 1811. In contrast to the Ashwell Hoard those three finds preserve almost no information concerning their discovery or archaeological context. In terms of its finding circumstances, then, the Ashwell Hoard is exceptional even amongst the small number of precious metal votive hoards from Roman Britain. But it is exceptional in other ways, too, most notably in the inclusion of a silver figurine, unique gold jewellery and votive plaques of gold and by the proportionately large number of plaques with votive inscriptions and with die-stamped figural decoration. The silver figurine of Senuna, a hitherto unknown native British goddess, is unparalleled in Roman Britain………If the dedication of a large, high-quality, silver-gilt figurine is evidence of a votary of some means amongst the followers of Senuna so, too, and even more so, is the gold jewellery, which may be interpreted as a suite. It is a very rare survival outside Rome itself. Numerically, the greater part of the Ashwell Hoard is the collection of 20 gold and silver votive leaf plaques, which, in form and number, are a unique survival. The importance of the hoard, whose ‘new’ goddess caught the imagination of the public as well as the academic world, was such that it demanded an archaeological investigation of the find-spot. Its discovery triggered the fieldwork that illuminated the immediate setting of the hoard and then expanded that setting into the wider landscape. The progressive results of fieldwalking, geophysical surveys and excavations led to a fuller understanding of the circumstances surrounding the choice of site for the burial of the hoard, of the nature and use of the site itself and of its relationship to surrounding structures, settlements and natural landscape features. Almost the first find from the excavations was the missing silver pedestal from the silver-gilt figurine, a key find, and, better still, inscribed. In reconnecting the image of the female deity to the dedicatory vow, inscribed for the votary Flavia Cunoris, it instantly multiplied the meanings and hugely enhanced the significance of an already important object. That discovery set the tone for the excavations, which went on to reveal not a formal temple building, as initially suspected, but a unique and fascinating open-air ritual site, where feasting, religious activity and ritual deposition took place over a long period of time, seemingly extending as far back as the Bronze Age.”

Dea Senuna: Treasure, Cult and Ritual at Ashwell, Hertfordshire” is now officially published and copies are available for sale at the British Museum http://www.britishmuseumshoponline.org/invt/cmc91947

1 2 3 13

There are no upcoming events at this time.